Lens-Artists Challenge #214: Favorite Finds

How do you narrow down your favorite finds, especially when you’ve already shared some of them? So, I’m switching things up a bit. Ann-Christine wants us to share favorite finds at museums, nature; anything that filled us with awe. My twist is to share a few from favorite outings and pictures that you may not have seen.

In Sacramento we have hot days where we look to photograph indoors. I’ve shown you some from IKEA. But it’s been a long time since we’ve visited a museum. They closed down in 2020 and have been slow to reopen. We enjoyed the Aerospace Museum in North Highlands. The old aircraft and space exhibits had a lot to offer us photographers.

Stores are another place we’d take our cameras to. The Antique Trove in Roseville was also closed during 2020. We’d take our time going through the small stalls, finding unique items. They also have an outside area that would, of course, be closed during rain storms. We could use one of those storms now. How would you like one of those cameras? It’s now a lamp. The windmill could give your yard a farm feel. And could you give a hoot?

Another museum we used to enjoy is the California Automobile Museum in Sacramento. One complication was the ropes that stopped us from touching the vehicles. My way of getting around that was to photograph close ups. While we still have horns, we’ve done away with lamp lighting. We’ve also done away with hood ornaments.

And new to me were barn quilts. I found out about The Rio Linda Elverta Quilt Trail Project, a group that put together a barn quilt route. A barn quilt is a painted wooden quilt pattern or replica of a sewn quilt. The women would meet in a garage and cut, saw and paint. They would do this for anyone who asked for their art. Along the route, we saw the quilts on houses, businesses and barns. Photo buddy Jim is standing behind the sign outside their garage.

And to finish up, I’ll show you Peggy Sue’s Diner in Barstow. Out in the California desert, in the middle of nowhere, is Peggy Sue’s. It’s worth the wait to go inside. I remember being amazed when we walked in. It was decorated with 50s and 60s movie and entertainment memorabilia. And the food is good too.

These are just some of the places we found to photograph, and I would love to go back now that they are fully open. Thank you Ann-Christine for having us concentrate on our favorites. Remember to link to her post when you respond and use the Lens-Artist tag. We’d love to see your post. And thank you all for your beautiful rays of sunshine in Amy’s Here Comes the Sun challenge. Next week John is going to have us concentrate on modes of transportation, so look for his post.

If you would like to participate weekly in our Lens-Artists Challenge, click here for more info. 

The heat is on: Sacramento History Museum

It’s either go out super early in the morning or go to a museum when it’s hot. In June we chose the museum–The Sacramento History Museum in Old Sacramento. As many times as I have been to Old Sacramento for various things, I never knew of this museum. I had my doubts as to whether it would be worthwhile. Was I surprised!

Not only did it give a great view of Sacramento’s history via pictures, text and artifacts, it was a photographer’s dream.

Just to give you a bit of the background, Sacramento was founded during the gold rush. You can read all about its history here. Being me I did all my photography before I started reading about my State Capitol’s history!

Here are some images of the lobby area.

The town’s newspaper, the Sacramento Bee. has a rich history in the area and is the newspaper I read daily. Of course, I now view it online. Here are exhibits dedicated to this newspaper.

As we were walking to our car, we saw a docent in period dress leading a tour and coming down to the museum. I thought this was a great museum to learn about Sacramento. It’s going to be a hot summer, so get ready for more museums!

Lens-Artists Challenge#144: Taking Flight

I don’t have many regrets, but one is when I had the opportunity to hang glide tandem and said “no.” If given the same opportunity today, I’d gladly accept. I did have the opportunity to take flight in a small plane and took it. What a feeling! Thank you Wright Brothers!

And thank you Tina for giving us this challenge. At first I thought of nature’s fliers–birds. Then I thought of our own history of flight, and what better way to understand that then a museum dedicated to soaring the skies and space. In North Highlands we have the Aerospace Museum of California. Inside the museum, there are small planes, engines and replicas of fighter jets. Part of the large interior is dedicated to various space exhibits. Leaving now is the Hubble exhibit. Upstairs is the Flight Zone, where everyone, in turn, gets to pilot a plane in simulation. That’s where my husband docents.

We go to take photos at the Aerospace Museum to practice, especially on rainy or hot days. Here is where I learned how to shoot HDR (bracketing). And, when you go to a place often, you learn how to see the same thing differently, and present a different composition. Let’s take a look. Comments are in the captions.

Inside

Outside: I don’t remember the type of planes these are and when they were flown. If my husband were here, he would tell us. But he’s off doing astronomy.

We take flight in many ways. Another of my goals is to go up in a hot air balloon. Someday!

Doing it while there’s time! Mare Island Museum & more.

The next two days look busy, but that’s nothing new for a retired lifestyle. Ask any retiree! They’ll probably say they are busier now than before. That’s because active people need to fill their time. I’m no different. So, what better use of my free time right now than to show you the pictures from the Mare Island Museum in Vallejo as promised in yesterday’s post.

Even though I’d been to Mare Island a few times before, I never visited the museum. I guess I was too busy taking photos. But since I’ve gained experience taking photos indoors without flash and tripod, this seemed like a good time to investigate what was in this large building.

What a surprise! Not only does the museum house Mare Island’s history, it also serves as a meeting place and banquet hall. Here are some images:

Additional photos from Mare Island.

That’s it for now! Time to relax!

It’s been a long time! The Haggin Museum, Stockton California

I’m still here! I just haven’t been shooting for fun lately. It’s been so hot and I’ve been lacking the incentive to go outside to take photos except for real estate shoots. I’m enjoying those, and I do a good job now. Practice makes perfect!

It seems we went from rain right into the summer heat waves. No Spring! Hopefully Autumn will be better. Last week we ended August at the Haggin Museum in Stockton California.

The outside was simple and pretty:

It was a lovely museum. The exhibits were well placed and accessible. The interior was sleek and very photographic.

We went there to see a black and white photography exhibit, Masters of American Photography, but we weren’t allowed to take pictures of it. The exhibit was outstanding! The collection featured images from Eadweard Muybridge, Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and others spanning from the 1880s to 1980s.

Since shipbuilding is Stockton’s oldest industry a Stephens Bros. Boat Builders exhibit was locate in one of the galleries.

On loan from the Smithsonian Institute, an exhibit explored Dolores Huerta’s public life as an activist and showed the multi-ethnic aspects of the labor movement.

There was also an exhibit of J. C. Leyendecker’s work for magazine covers and advertisements. This gallery was cleverly placed in the hall spanning the entire circle upstairs.

The museum has three levels. The bottom level showed store fronts as they looked in Stockton’s early days.

They also had small galleries featuring rifles, etc. and American Indian items.

They also had vehicles, agricultural machinery, old fire engine and European Art. One of my favorites was the globe clock.

I also tried to shoot through glass windows without a tripod or polarizing filter!

And, a museum featuring famous photographers would miss a great marketing opportunity if they didn’t cater to photographers in their store!

I hope you enjoyed this visit!

Rainy day visit: Folsom Prison

We’ve pretty much exhausted our rainy day photography options. We’ve been to the Antique Trove twice, IKEA once, and last Tuesday we went to Folsom Prison. Doesn’t everyone want to visit a prison?

I was a little disappointed when all we could photograph was the one gate and from a distance. We were also not allowed to take pictures of officers or inmates. The small museum saved the morning. There were treasures in there. However, shooting through the glass enclosures proved to be difficult!

Aside from the Johnny Cash concerts, Folsom Prison was one of the nation’s first maximum security prisons. It was built in the decades following the 1848 California Gold Rush, relieving the overcrowding at San Quentin State Prison.

Today the prison houses medium security male inmates.

Take a look at what I saw, beginning with the outside.

Inside the museum there were many inmate made artifacts.

And there were some weapons made by inmates too!

Some other things at the museum.

There was quite a bit of space dedicated to the Johnny Cash concerts.

Good-bye Folsom Prison!

Still standing: Folsom Powerhouse State Historic Park, Folsom

Remember that cold I was complaining about? I still have it! But, at least I’m still standing when so many of my friends have succumbed to the flu. This isn’t a complaint, okay it is! When I’m sick, I can’t regain enough energy to not be tired. And, this affects my ability to do photography.

Before this cold/flu hit the Sacramento area, my Tuesday group was given a special tour of the Historic Folsom Powerhouse in Folsom. This small power source once lit up all of Sacramento. The following from Wikipedia illustrates the  significance of the powerhouse.

“Before the Folsom powerhouse was built nearly all electric power houses were using direct current (DC) generators powered by steam engines located within a very few miles of where the power was needed. The use of rushing water to generate hydroelectric power and then transmitting it long distances to where it could be used was not initially economically feasible as long as the electricity generated was low-voltage direct current. Once it was invented, AC power made it feasible to convert the electrical power to high voltage by using the newly invented transformers and to then economically transmit the power long distances to where it was needed. Lower voltage electrical power, which is much easier and safer to use, could be easily gotten by using transformers to convert the high voltage power to lower voltages near where it was being used. DC power cannot use a transformer to change its voltage. The Folsom Powerhouse, using part of the American River‘s rushing water to power its turbines connected to newly invented AC generators, generated three phase 60 cycle AC electricity (the same that’s used today in the United States) that was boosted by newly invented transformers from 800 volts as generated to 11,000 volts and transmitted to Sacramento over a 22 mi (35 km)-long distribution line, one of the longest electrical distribution lines in the United States at the time.”

The tour was great, especially since it was led by a photographer who has since joined our Tuesday group. While our guide explained the history and how the Powerhouse operated, I listened and continued shooting. Unfortunately, I should have been taking notes!

But since I didn’t, follow the link for more information on the Powerhouse.

We have since been on other outings, and you’ll see those in future posts. Maybe by then the cold will just be a memory and I’ll be out there clicking away.