Lens-Artists Challenge #198: Light and Shadow

“In layman’s terms, photography is quite simply the process of capturing light with a camera to create an image.”… PhotographyTalk.com

When you read the above quote, you realize that Patti’s challenge of Light and Shadow goes to the essence of what we do as photographers. We can’t take a picture without light or the absence of it, shadow.

In fact, in black and white photography you absolutely need the contrast between light and shadow. The image below is Waterton Lake in Waterton Lake National Park, Canada. The success of it in black and white relies on the light, shadows and contrast.

Next we have a sculpture at the River Walk in West Sacramento. On the left see it as it really is, and on the right see the shadow it casts.

Light can also add character to a subject. The way the light hits this old wheel adds to its texture and age and adds shadows.

This aging sculpture in the Sacramento Historic City Cemetery is back lit. The sun almost adds a halo effect.

Just changing your perspective changes the image. The feeling of this iconic sculpture in Roseville taken in bright sunlight changes when taken from a different side and in the shade.

And, finally, what do we do when there is no light? We use artificial light. The Tower theater’s sign is shining bright in neon in Downtown Roseville, and a Christmas display lights up this fake house front, putting the people in shadow.

How we use light and shadow creates our own personal photography style.

Thank you Patti for this fun post and bringing us back to the basics of photography. When you post your reply, remember to link to Patti’s post and tag Lens-Artists. Next week’s challenge will be presented by Ann-Christine through her Leya site. So stay tuned!

 If you would like to participate weekly in our Lens-Artists Challenge, just click this link and join us: https://photobyjohnbo.wordpress.com/about-lens-artists/

Sacramento Museum Day part 2: The California Automobile Museum

Muscle cars, race cars, classic cars. You can find them all at the California Automobile Museum in Sacramento. And we found them all, including lots of people. You sort of expect that when it’s free museum day. We were’nt allowed to bring in our tripods because of the crowded condition, so we made the best of it.

I decided to shoot parts of the cars rather than the entire vehicle. A surprise was the small cafe made to look like the interior of a 50s ice cream parlor. That was fun to shoot. I also met a nice couple who were curious as to why I was shooting the top of a table. I wonder what they were thinking until I explained that I was shooting the reflection of the neon sign.

I was also surprised to learn that this museum changes exhibits quarterly. Marlene and I are going back to shoot the next exhibit. You’ll see what it is next month.

Meanwhile enjoy the best of the classic, antique and muscle cars.

On the road again: family reunion in Las Vegas

We went in search of neon last night. Actually we went to the Linq an outdoor shopping center. Jim suggested I go there to get a good shot of the High Roller (a 550-foot observation wheel) and a fountain. The High Roller is the tallest observation wheel in the world and takes one hour to ride. I heard it costs $35 per person. It’s easy to shoot since it doesn’t move fast!

The shopping center was fun to walk through, not too crowded and had a variety of shops and restaurants. I hope you enjoy what I managed to capture.

Today we are going to visit with Anita and Jim again. I’m looking forward to this post-reunion visit. We go home tomorrow, hoping to drive straight through. Do we sound anxious to get home–yes!

Tomorrow were going to hit the highway in search of home!