Back from Death Valley and drying up, part 6

It’s partly cloudy today, and it’s nice to go to the store without getting rained on. I know we should feel blessed to finally have rain, but a break is nice. More is due next week. Southern California is digging out from mud slides, and I’m hoping the families whose homes are near the summer’s King Fire are doing okay.

We’re almost done with Death Valley. Today I’m going to show you images from Twenty Mule Team Canyon and of Tom. I was walking Gem in the morning and saw Tom sitting on a table engrossed in what I thought was a music sheet and playing his guitar. His feet were propped up on an orange 5 gallon pail. I told Gem that we had to rush back to our trailer to get the camera. Yes, I do talk to the dog, and yes, he does try to understand. We did get back to Tom. I took some candid shots before he noticed me. Then we talked as I shot more. It was great to meet and talk with him.

After that we left for our drive/hike tour of our last day. Tom hikes the back country and avoids the “tourist areas.” I guess we’re tourists! Our luck had changed because they just opened the Twenty Mule Team Canyon that morning. It’s a drive through canyon, although you could stop and hike, and just beautiful.

See for yourself!

On the road again: Sick in Death Valley, California, part 2

Yes, still sick. Yesterday was a bust. I slept through the morning and two guys slept through the afternoon. So we stayed put. I can’t say I feel a whole lot better, but at least I’m walking upright!

To make up for our day off, we’re having a full day. I figure I can sleep in the truck if I need to! Oh, we have a camp mascot—a coyote. He roams around the campground. Hopefully, I’ll get a shot of him before we leave. Of course we’re very careful with our dog.

Today, I’m going to show you the Borax Museum. The Borax Company’s history is rich in this area as a mining company. Our Ranger guide at the Inn told us that Borax wanted to have this area designated as a National Park and did whatever they could to make it happen. In 1933, Death Valley was designated as a National Monument and became a National Park in 1994.Borax is still mining here.

The museum is a small structure and has artifacts from the old mining era. However, outside, I found my own gold mine—a bunch of old rusted mining equipment.

That equipment can’t be brought back to life, but I hope I don’t feel old and rusted for too much longer!

Finally got my photo fix: Family Thanksgiving weekend, Monterey

Shoot, shoot, shoot. Yes, I did a lot of shooting Thanksgiving weekend. We had one great day, and then the rain came. Fortunately, by the time we got out to see the sights, it had stopped raining. However, it was cold, damp and overcast. Not the opportune time to take photos.

At the butterfly sanctuary, the Monarchs were huddled and not really flying around. They hang from branches high up on trees, and my 300 mm had a difficult time reaching them. But, I did my best–with Richard’s help. I have a difficult time bending my head back; I get dizzy. So, Richard became my human tripod. I leaned up against him and had him hold my elbows so I could steady the camera. I had two other alternatives: 1. to hand him the camera; 2. to go get the tripod. But why take the easy way!!

The weather was in my favor when we visited the lighthouse. But, no blue skies. This wraps up our Thanksgiving weekend. We are on our way to Death Valley. I’m looking forward to more shooting, shooting, shooting.

Finally got my photo fix: Family Thanksgiving weekend at KOA, Watsonville, California

Yes, I finally shot my way out of the funk! I shot grandkids, beach, surfers, buildings, people, butterflies, a lighthouse and more. I think this may be a three-parter, but we’ll see. We’re leaving on Wednesday for Death Valley National Park. So I have to be quick.

Let’s start at the beginning–the very sandy campground. No it wasn’t on the beach, but the children’s play areas were in sand which my dog sat in. Needless to say, sand was all over the trailer! But the grandkids had a great time, and isn’t that what is important?